Kenyan invents smart gloves that translate sign language movements into plain language audio

Kenyan invents smart gloves that translate sign language movements into plain language audio...recognises letters as against hand movements..
Roy Allela's gloves that converts sign language into audio speech

Speech impairment affects more than 30 million people around the world. People like that basically use sign language in order to communicate. But not everybody on earth knows and understands sign language. The result of the situation imposes a language barrier on our communication with such people.
This situation has compelled Roy Allela to devise the smart gloves that converts sign language movements into plain language audio.

Meanwhile, you can check out Maariba, the app for artisans.

Necessity gives birth to invention…

As the popular maxim, necessity is the mother of invention. Allela’s 6 year old niece was born deaf. The kid and the family found it difficult to communicate since none of them knew or understood sign language. This originally brought the idea to create the smart gloves to communicate with the little child.

Kenyan invents smart gloves that translate sign language movements into plain language audio...recognises letters as against hand movements..
Roy Allela

The 25 year old Kenyan’s invention to help his niece communicate with the family is now a major invention. Sign-io, the sign language to speech translation gloves has been made to recognise various letters as against the movements of the hands. It then transfers the movements to an Android application which deduces the movements to plain language audio.

Good work, brother…

This invention has landed Roy Allela many recognitions and praises. His smart gloves has received recognition from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). This thumbs up from the world’s largest organization for mechanical engineers happened during its prestigious 2017 ASME Innovation Showcase (ISHOW) competition.
At the end of the ISHOW competition, Roy Allela and two other African inventors, from Uganda and Ghana took home the Grand Prize.

The other finalists were Brian Gitta, from Uganda and Charles Antipem, from Ghana. Gritta developed the Matibabu, which is a device used to test for Malaria. The Ghanaian, Charles Antipem, created a Science Set. The Science Set is a portable and highly scalable science lab that can fit in backpack and on the desk of students.

The 3 African inventors won $500,000 in cash plus some other in-kind prizes, together with other inventors.

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