9 ways to write an interesting research paper
Pile of papers organized with paper clips on a blue background

When you’re tasked with writing a research paper you can easily become stressed and filled with a sense of dread. There are so many different directions you could go in, topics you need to learn about, and people you need to speak to. It’s no wonder that you’re looking for a little inspiration, which is why it’s great that you’ve found this article. You’ll learn some simple and proven hints and tips that will turn you into an expert writer in no time. Here’s everything you need to know.

Pick a topic you’re passionate about

Perhaps the most important thing to do is pick a topic you care about. If you’re stuck writing about something in great detail that you just don’t connect with, that lack of passion is going to show through in the quality of your work. Find a topic that brings your imagination and analytical thinking skills to life and you’ll really be onto something.

Come at a common problem from a unique angle

There are so many papers out there that do little more than reconfirm past studies by rehashing their work. There’s nothing wrong with building up a body of scientific opinion, but it’s not going to help your career if that’s all you ever contribute to the debate.

When you want to stand out from the crowd you need to approach problems from new angles, so make sure you give plenty of thought to how you’re going to do it.

Use online tools to enable collaboration

If you want to create a truly compelling paper, you’re going to need a degree of external input. By being able to call on a diverse range of skills and experiences, you’ll be able to broaden your horizons and create a piece that will have a lot more to say for itself. Here’s a few tools that are great when you want to collaborate:

TrustMyPaper: A good option when you want to get in touch with an expert writer who will have some familiarity with your chosen topic.

GrabMyEssay: Experts in fast turnarounds when you need help with proofing and redrafting. Something which is particularly important if you have a conference in a couple of days.

Google Docs: An ideal free tool that allows your entire network of collaborators to brainstorm ideas in a central document. Great if you want to set the tone for a fruitful set of working relationships.

Grammarly: A handy tool that no writer should be without when they’re searching for the final polish and literary flourish that makes all the difference to readability.

Don’t be taken in by viral topics

There are certain topics that seem to explode online almost overnight, but that doesn’t mean you should be compelled to try and find something useful to say about them. If an area isn’t your speciality, don’t be taken in by the need to chase it just because a lot of people are talking about it. The best way to build your profile as a writer is to throw yourself into your work with vigor and gusto so that you can showcase what you can do.

Stay motivated when you get corrections

The art of staying motivated is all about focusing on the long term goal, and not so much the short term pain. You are bound to get corrections and rebuttals when you send your work round for comment, and you’ll get more of the same when you send it off for publication. The key here is not to allow this rite of passage to knock your confidence. You need to stay the course, believe in yourself, and keep on working on your manuscript until it’s everything you want it to be.

“As a writer I’ve always been a big believer in the importance of self-motivation. It’s what allows you to keep going when you don’t feel like you’re making enough progress, and it’s such an important skill to build” — says Jennifer Canning, writer at WowGrade.

Write about what you know

If you limit yourself to writing about what you know you might be forgiven for thinking that you’re doing yourself a disservice. But really this doesn’t mean simply tell your life story, it means do your research before putting pen to paper. There’s nothing to be gained from jumping into a highly complex problem and throwing out a third rate manuscript no one is ever going to read. In fact, all that will do is damage your reputation and make it less likely that people will pay much attention to the next piece of work you present for publication.

Use precise and concise language at all times

When you want your work to be noticed for all the right reasons, you need to make sure every word counts. Find a phrase that encapsulates an entire idea quickly and succinctly whenever you can. And if you can’t find it, tools like Studicus, BestEssay, and Hemingway will enable you to find the turn of phrase that’s been evading you during the drafting process.

Choose an engaging title

When you have to choose your title it can be hard to know which direction to go in. The key is to use as few words as possible, whilst still informing about the main theme and intention of your paper. It’s an art form that you’ll need to practice like any other, so don’t be hard on yourself if you go through a dozen or so titles before settling on one that does your work justice. The right title is the perfect first impression every engaging research paper needs, and it will be worth the little bit of extra work when dozens of people begin to cite your paper.

Write with confidence from the very first line

If you want to write like an expert in your field then you need to convey a grasp of the details with a sense of authority. Be concise and definite with your judgements, and keep the emotion and sentiment out of your work. A research paper is supposed to be as objective, authoritative, and quantitative as possible. If you get these three things working in perfect harmony you’ll soon see what a difference they make to the quality of your writing.

Final Thoughts

Now that you’ve heard some words of wisdom about how to write an interesting research paper, it’s over to you to start putting pen to paper. You might find it a little daunting at first, but if you approach your work with intensity and focus you’ll soon have a very credible first draft on your hands. From there you need to seek feedback and input from further afield and take onboard everything you hear.

About the Author

Nicole D.Garrison is a content strategist, writer, and contributor at SupremeDissertations and a number of platforms for marketing specialists. She is a dedicated and experienced author who pays particular attention to quality research. At her free time, Nicole is a passionate runner and a curious beekeeper. Moreover, she runs her own blog LiveInspiredMagazine.

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